How Often Should a Man Ejaculate?

It’s normal to want to know that you’re normal. And whether you’re masturbating a few times a day, swearing off sex and self-love or find yourself somewhere in between, it’s reassuring to find out where you fall within the spectrum of other men. 

But knowing about ejaculation frequency isn’t only about feeling normal. Ejaculation has been tied to a few different health benefits, and you want to reap those, right? If scientists say orgasming is good for your health, then why deprive ourselves? 

Anyway, now that we’ve convinced you, here’s what the science says about how often you should ejaculate.

TL;DR What You Need to Know 

  • There is no single answer to how often men ejaculate, on average. Depending on the source, it could be anywhere from weekly to daily. 
  • Ejaculation may decrease your risk of prostate cancer. The science backs this up. 
  • Ejaculating may improve sleep quality and mood. 
  • There are no negative effects of frequent ejaculation on sperm health.

How Often Do Most Men Ejaculate?

Ejaculation frequency is all over the map. It seems to depend on who you ask, who does the asking, where they are and when. 

In general, it’s easier to find data on masturbation frequency than ejaculation frequency. So while not every “session” is a solo one, let’s look at how often men around the world are reportedly rubbing one out. 

A 2007 survey from dating site CupidBay found English men to masturbate an average eight times per week, and Scottish and Welsh men daily. However, the survey was taken of CupidBay members, who may or may not be representative of men overall. 

In yet another survey from across the pond, The Irish Times found 25 percent of men in Ireland masturbate every day. This survey was drawn from a much larger pool of over 12,000 participants, though the responses were not weighted to be representative of the population.

A 2018 gobal survey from sex toy company TENGA found 57 percent of men between the ages of 18 and 24 masturbate weekly. The sample size on this survey was also large, with over 13,000 participants, and responses were weighted to be globally representative.

While this data is not very specific, it may set your mind at ease to know that some men ejaculate daily, while others do weekly. In other words, there’s no secret schedule you’re not privy to. 

Ejaculation Frequency and Prostate Cancer Risk

Perhaps the most exciting news about the “messy” business of ejaculation is that it may help prevent prostate cancer. Indeed, there is scientific evidence backing this hypothesis, and it’s worth getting excited about. 

The largest, and most comprehensive study on the topic was a 2016 longitudinal (across 18 years) study of roughly 32,000 men. Researchers found that men who ejaculated more than 20 times per month were 20 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer, on average.

In the study, the researchers controlled for things like body mass index and alcohol — things that can impact prostate cancer risk — and still found the negative correlation between ejaculation and prostate cancer to hold true. The study relied on men to self-report their ejaculation frequency, which opens the data up to error, but it remains a promising piece of research.

Better Sleep After Ejaculation

You know you sleep better after sexual activity or even masturbation. It relaxes you, releases some tension. Some of you may have even caught flack from your past partners for rolling over and snoring while they still wanted pillow talk — we’ve all been there, right?

While there seems to be a tie between ejaculation and sleep quality, there’s little research in this area and nothing pointing to optimal ejaculation frequency for the best possible sleep.

While the research on this particular topic is scant, the stuff out there seems promising.

One 2019 study involving 778 male and female participants found that orgasms achieved both with a partner and solo appeared to have a positive effect sleep outcomes, sleep latency and overall sleep quality. 

About 74 percent of men reported improved sleep quality and 68 percent reported getting to sleep more quickly after orgasming with a partner. 

The rates of perceived sleep benefits after masturbating to orgasm was lower than after sex with a partner — 54 percent reported better sleep quality and 48 percent improved sleep onset.

Better Mood 

Like sleep, hormone fluctuations during and after ejaculations can make you feel good mentally. 

And again, like sleep, there is no good research on the ideal ejaculation frequency to deliver the best mood results. 

We do know that dopamine levels rise during sex and as you reach climax — giving you feelings of intense pleasure and well-being. Once you orgasm, dopamine drops as prolactin rises, leaving you feeling satisfied and content. And that feeling, as you well know, is pure bliss.

Risks of Frequent Ejaculation

You may have heard that frequent ejaculation is bad for you. But that’s generally just not the case

One small 2011 study evaluated the effects of daily ejaculation on sperm health and found that while sperm volume unsurprisingly decreased with daily ejaculations (there was less semen, overall), things like motility percent, DNA integrity and other markers of sperm health were not affected.

Of course, there are physical ramifications to masturbating or having too much sex too often. We’re talking about friction burns, fellas. Always make sure to use lubrication — seriously, we can’t say that enough.

The Bottom Line on Ejaculation Frequency

So when push comes to shove, it seems there’s still a lot of exploring still left to do on the topic of ejaculation frequency. 

The research supports a clear link between ejaculation and a reduced risk of prostate cancer, and it seems like there may be a link between ejaculating and sleep quality, mood quality, etc.

Luckily, it’s also pretty clear you can’t really overdo it. 

As we always say here at hims, the best offense is a good defense. Have fun out there, fellas!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.